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Study shows that owning a dog could lead to a longer life

1- There are so many benefits to owning a dog

How true is the hypothesis that owning a dog could lead to a longer life following a stroke or heart attack. For one, you get woken up with wet kisses a day. Sometimes that can be not very pleasant, but the fact that it means that another creature loves you unconditionally is enough reason to love it, even if you get fewer minutes of sleep. Without any doubt, dogs are our best friends because they love us no matter what.

Dogs do not know that you suck at parking, or that you cheated on your ex-girlfriend. They love you for what's inside your heart. We can learn more a lot from that kind of unconditional love. It's not unlike the love a mother has for her child.

Most people love dogs except for those who had a bad experience in their childhood. In many ways, dogs are universal. Owning a dog can make you a more active person, it can offer you companionship, and in line with a new study, it can even help you live longer. owning a dog could lead to a longer life following a stroke or heart attack.

dog ownership helps lower blood pressure
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2- New study published in Circulation

Cardiovascular quality and outcomes have concluded that dog ownership may actually provide a better and longer life for people who have survived a heart attack or stroke.

Glenn N. Levine M.D. is one of the studies authors. He said The findings in these two well-done studies and analyses repose on prior studies and also the conclusions of the 2013 AHA scientific statement 'Pet ownership and cardiovascular risk' that dog ownership is related to reductions in factors that contribute to cardiac risk and cardiovascular events.

These two studies provide good, quality data, indicating that dog ownership is associated with reduced cardiac and all-cause mortality. While these nonrandomized studies cannot 'prove' that owning or adopting a dog directly results in reduced mortality, these robust findings are certainly at least suggestive of this.

dog ownership helps lower rates of loneliness
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3- 33% higher rates of life

Previous studies have shown that lack of physical activity in addition to social isolation can negatively affect patients. This is what sparked the concept to look further into dog ownership's health benefits. Previous research has proved that dog ownership helps lower blood pressure, so it was natural to check into dog ownership's heart benefits. The study looked at data of patients aged 40 to 85 who had a stroke or a heart attack.

They compared the data of these people with those of dog owners. Following a heart attack, death's risk was 33% lower than those who did not own a dog. The risk of death following stroke was 27% lower.

dog ownership heart benefits
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4- It's not just dogs that help either

Those with a child or partner had lower rates of death following a heart attack or stroke as well. Simply owning a dog can lead to a lower risk of heart attack and stroke. Out of 182,000 who had heart attacks, only 6 percent were dog owners. And out of 155,000 people who suffered a stroke, 5 percent were dog owners. That data suggests that simply owning a dog could lead to a lower risk of both ailments.

dog ownership helps lower rates of depression
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5- Explanation

This can be explained by the increase in physical activity related to the adoption of a dog, as well as the lower rates of loneliness and depression. it's a good reminder that humans need social interaction and exercise to thrive. "we know that social isolation is a strong risk factor for premature death and worse health outcomes. previous studies have indicated that dog owners have more interaction with people and experience less social isolation. Furthermore, keeping a dog is a good motivation for physical activity, which is a crucial factor in rehabilitation and mental health."

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